Scrap Iron – a Pan Worth Salvaging

To the poor souls who left a set of perfectly good cast iron pans atop their dumpster, I thank you.  They have given us years of service and continue to treat us well.

I don’t know exactly when it took place, but at some point a member of my family caught out of the corner of their eye a garbage bin sitting by the road awaiting the trash pickup of the day.  On top of this bin sat three cast iron skillets.  Let’s be clear: they were in disrepair.  In fact, from what I’ve been told, they were pretty gross - but nothing some oil and alfalfa pellets couldn’t fix.  My wife had them scrubbed and seasoned in time to box them up and place them under the Christmas tree.  Nailed it!

Braised lamb and other dishes that require time on the stovetop and in the oven are great uses for cast iron.

Braised lamb and other dishes that require time on the stovetop and in the oven are great uses for cast iron.

They say nothing lasts forever, but a cast iron skillet – when treated properly – can and should be one of those kitchen items that provides you with years of cooking utility.  They are also incredibly versatile: great for sauteing, searing, deep-frying, braising, roasting, stir-fry, and much more.

We’ll discuss the proper care of a cast iron vessel as we make skillet cornbread to go with our tomato-based soups as part of our 4-part soup series. Check the sessions page to see if the session is currently being offered, or contact me to book a private group session.


Did you know I have a YouTube channel?

I recently pieced together footage from my July appearance at the Union County Farmers Market demonstrating how to make summer squash fritters and two ways to serve roasted beets.  Check it out for yourself, and be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel while you're at it!